Stonewall 50: Ideological Diversity Ranges from Left to Far Left

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4 Comments for “Stonewall 50: Ideological Diversity Ranges from Left to Far Left”

  1. posted by Jorge on

    “Although we share the same oppressors, white queer folks must come to terms with the fact that they play a role in the harm experienced by their Black and Brown siblings.”

    There is an entire Black History Month in February to work on that cause.

    “But while June has become a month-long celebration for many, it’s apparent that we currently have two different prides occurring.

    …Black folks like myself are attending rallies for the death of our trans sisters — most recently Layleen Polanco Xtranveganza, who was found dead in her jail cell in Rikers Island, and Zoe Spears, who was shot to death on June 15. Unfortunately, this is nothing new for the Black queer community; the architects and elders of the movement have been all but erased. This white gay privilege exists year-round, but it is particularly frustrating during Pride.

    While Black queer people are still fighting for survival, white queer people were fighting for marriage equality.”

    I can think of any number of ways to marshal support for a change of behavior in white gays.

    Blacking brown and black stripes on the rainbow flag seems to me to be the best way to sabotage such an effort. You cannot defeat oppression by oppressing other people.

    This bears constant repeating: Nobody cares that it’s an “hypocritical” principle or “we really are being oppressed!” You cannot defeat oppression by oppressing other people. Either you want to exert power over others, or you want other people to change their behavior and attitudes. Make up your mind.

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  2. posted by Jorge on

    Anyway, I learned something interesting yesterday when I finally dragged my butt to church. When the spirit moves you to act, that’s the time to move. With each day of delay, something is lost. This was a year of disappointment for me, as I was moved to act, and waited.

    Although the agency I work for made a big deal about Pride month, in the office it is just a few tiny deals (I’ll grant there’s that much) in comparison to the strong local support in the events most people celebrate. The office is not majority LGBT.

    Seeing that the rest of the country’s LGBT diversity is limited between the “far-left and the left”, I have considerable self-doubt about expressing what the so-called LGBT Pride movement means to me. Many of the people considered models and exemplars, I feel like puking just looking at them. The same could be said of those I see as idealized models. What is it that people need to see and hear?

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  3. posted by Mike King & David "TJ" Bauler on

    Point 1. If you are willing to put in the work and get involved, I can have some sympathy for those homocons who feel ignored during pride events. If you are simply going to sit around and complain, I have little sympathy. To many homocons are professional complainers.

    Point 2: Yes, white privilege does exist. What can be done about it, at the level of planning a pride parade is a different story.

    Point 3. The political right — in America — has not done much to compete for LGBT voters. Homocons have made some progress, I would not suggest otherwise, but center-left and left politics have actually come a long way in changing (or seeking to change) anti-gay laws and the like.

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    • posted by Jorge on

      Point 1. If you are willing to put in the work and get involved, I can have some sympathy for those homocons who feel ignored during pride events. If you are simply going to sit around and complain, I have little sympathy. To many homocons are professional complainers.

      Ah, yes, the priest talked about the dangers of skepticism, cynicism, fatalism, and nihilism to the faithful. It might apply here as well.

      One who dares to place one’s own fate in the hands of God should learn the courage to place the community’s self-determination in those same hands as well. Sounds like a paradox, but it is the truth. To “know better” is a path toward bitterness and emptiness.

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