Secular Religious Intolerance

2 Comments for “Secular Religious Intolerance”

  1. posted by JohnInCA on

    […] as when we catapulted almost immediately from “legalize gay weddings” to “force Christian bakers to make their wedding cakes.

    As always, if you have to lie to make your point, your point probably isn’t that great.

    New Mexico passed non-discrimination protections for LGBT people in 2003. The Elane Photography case, which involved a refusal of service for a commitment ceremony, was started in 2005. New Mexico would not legalize same-sex marriage until 2013.

    Colorado passed non-discrimination protections for LGBT people in 2008. The Masterpiece Cakeshop case, which involved a refusal of service a reception, was started in 2012. Colorado would not legalize same-sex marriage until 2014.

    So no. There was no catapulting. What happened was two different campaigns (one for non-discrimination laws, one for marriage equality) that were happening at the same time. The legislative and judicial decisions in one do not meaningfully rely on the legislative and judicial decisions in the other (see: many states had non-discrimination protections for LGBT people for years, even decade in many cases, before they had marriage equality. Likewise, many states have marriage equality and still do not have any non-discrimination protections for LGBT people)

    So to reiterate: if you have to lie to support your argument, your argument is bad, you’re a liar, and you should feel bad.

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  2. posted by Jorge on

    Not a lie. The editor forced in those scare quotes to make it a true statement.

    So no. There was no catapulting. What happened was two different campaigns (one for non-discrimination laws, one for marriage equality) that were happening at the same time.

    (Tick. Tick. Tick.)

    No.

    The trajectory of Campaign 2 can be impacted mid-flight by the endpoint of Campaign 1.

    Reply

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