‘Tolerance’ Excludes Gay Republicans


11 Comments for “‘Tolerance’ Excludes Gay Republicans”

  1. posted by Tom Scharbach on

    Homocons must be competing with conservative Christians for the “World’s Most Put-Upon Humans” title, given the incessant whining about how oppressed they are in the United States.

    As Bernard Meltzer, late of the University of Chicago Law School, used to chide students when they moaned about how hard they had it, “Life is hard.”

    So grow a pair, thicken up the skin, and stop whining that nobody, nobody, not even Job, endured so much affliction and misery, so unfairly.

    Reply
    • posted by Jorge on

      As Bernard Meltzer, late of the University of Chicago Law School, used to chide students when they moaned about how hard they had it, “Life is hard.”

      Given that it is more difficult in this country for a gay person to be gay than for a gay person to be Republican, I trust then that you will join me in taking this view to its logical conclusion: bake your own cake.

      Everyone, plug your ears for the inevitable “Waaaaah! Waaaaah! Waaaaah! Waaaaah!” No, not from you, Tom. Your inevitable is the Stephen Miller move (the other Stephen Miller): remove dagger from cloak and stab to get what you think is yours by right.

      Reply
    • posted by Tom Scharbach on

      Given that it is more difficult in this country for a gay person to be gay than for a gay person to be Republican …

      The homocons who complain the loudest (Milo, Chadwick et al) about gay Republicans being oppressed by mainstream gays share a common characteristic: all live in the bluest of the blue enclaves of the country.

      My guess is that if they moved into the depths of Red America, they would not longer feel so oppressed by mainstream gays. Maybe that’s what they should do if they find living in the blue enclaves so intolerable.

      As an aside, the porn memes about straight rednecks who appreciate a good submissive can’t be all fantasy, so maybe they’d get a sex life out of the deal, too.

      Reply
  2. posted by David Bauler on

    Actually, I have quite a few Republican friends of mine. They don’t generally scream, “oppression” whenever we don’t agree about something we read about in the news.

    I don’t always agree with everything that everyone does – policy wise – in either major party. When you call a sitting president the best one ever, as an example, that doesn’t pass the smell test on so many levels.

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  3. posted by David Bauler on

    Members of minor parties have legitimate grievances about how this electoral system is,, oppressive. I am not saying that we should change our system, but their complaints have some legitimacy.

    When major party members try to complain about political oppression, I’m a bit skeptical. Their are problems with voter disenfranchisement and how legislative districts are created, but people are very rarely actually oppressed for being a member of a major party.

    Oftentimes, claims of political oppression are really coming from people who think that everyone must agree with them, or else. Or, everyone must like them on social media, or else.

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  4. posted by MR Bill on

    Of course your fellow gay/GLBT folks have a right to be horrified that one would support the party that has generally treated US folks as the enemy, and persists at the state and local level with attempts to demonize and damage gay folks…

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  5. posted by Tom Scharbach on

    Actually, I have quite a few Republican friends of mine. They don’t generally scream, “oppression” whenever we don’t agree about something we read about in the news.

    I have a lot of conservative friends, too. Thoughtful, intelligent conservative friends.

    Looking at the link Stephen provided to that incredible jerk Chadwick Moore (“Facistbook**”, indeed), I suspect that the main reason that the homocons who whine so much about being rejected and oppressed by mainstream gays and lesbians are rejected, is that they insist on being as obnoxious, loudly and insistently, as often as possible.

    Nobody wants to hang around with bores.

    ** As I’ve said many times, the minute that some asshole plays the Hitler/Nazi/Fascist card, reason has left the room as far as I am concerned.

    Reply
  6. posted by JohnInCA on

    Hey, “conservative” gay men† think folks should be able to kick you to the curb because you’re gay. So clearly outright rejection is part of the level of “tolerance” they think they’re owed.
    ________
    †I’m sure there are conservative LGBT folk that aren’t gay men. But they don’t seem to complain as much.

    Reply
  7. posted by Kosh III on

    Trump to allow discrimination in health care for “religious” objections.

    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/16/conscience-abortion-transgender-patients-health-care-289542

    So much for all you who voted for a shithole because he lied about his support for gay people. I hope you are the first ones to get sick and die.

    Reply
    • posted by Tom Scharbach on

      So much for all you who voted for a shithole because he lied about his support for gay people.

      I didn’t vote for Candidate Trump, obviously, but I think it only fair to point out (as I did a number of times before the election) that Trump’s positions on LGBT matters as the Republican nominee were substantively identical to the positions taken by the 2016 Republican platform.

      Candidate Trump made a few gestures (the upside down rainbow flag was a beauty, and more predictive than not), but his substantive positions on LGBT issues were just as awful as those of the 2016 Republican platform, and that’s a fact.

      If anyone supported Candidate Trump because he was “gay supportive”, either they didn’t bother to consider his substantive positions or they were morons.

      Reply
      • posted by Kosh III on

        “either they didn’t bother to consider his substantive positions or they were morons.”

        It’s not an either/or; if you voted for the bigot you ARE a moron.

        Reply

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