Intersectionality Dogma and a Few Remaining Holdouts

The author confuses Log Cabin Republicans with GOProud. Also, here’s a more historical view (albeit less politcally correct) of the patrons of the Stonewall Inn who fought back.

Related:

5 Comments for “Intersectionality Dogma and a Few Remaining Holdouts”

  1. posted by Jorge on

    “It is, in sum, a rift between the intersectionalists and the non-intersectionalists.”

    mmm-hmm

    “Weiss said that in order to liberate all members of the LGBTQ+ community, it is necessary to elevate those with the least privilege. “Intersectionality is absolutely crucial to our movement — it’s not just one thing at a time that we need to fight.””

    “There are people who are undocumented, with disabilities, impacted by state-sanctioned violence in ways cisgender white queer people are not,” Hunter said. “With intersectionality, we’re talking about centering those voices that have been erased by cisgender white queers.”

    I could not disagree more.

    I voted for Donald Trump, and it would be no exaggeration to say that a big reason was because he is anti-political correctness. Gay white men, politically correct and otherwise, are plastering their faces all over the right-leaning media and political corridors. Make people disaffected from a social movement, and like as not they’ll consolidate power elsewhere. Are these intersectionalists sure they know what they’re doing? I will fight for the right to be let alone. I won’t let anyone take that away from me, no matter if they’re white, black, purple, gay, straight, or trinary.

    “To do this, gay white cisgender men have to not only let their guard down and listen but also acknowledge the relative power they wield and use it to elevate those lower down who have been historically marginalized.

    “The key to justice is acknowledgment,” said Jones, who is currently at work on an intersectional news show for Free Speech TV. “White cisgender gay men have to acknowledge that they have a disproportionate amount of power in the movement that has accrued to them for historical reasons that are wrong.””

    How many times do people who have teach other people who to attain power and success before they’ll be satisfied?

    “For all the division intersectional conversations have sown, Jones said its ultimate end is equality for all.”

    To take this to its logical conclusion, they would rather that all people have less power and fewer rights, so long as nobody has more power and more rights than somebody else. But in a country founded on the idea that everyone has certain inalienable rights, this will erode civil rights and eliminate freedom. We will never have the discussions we need to have to eliminate oppression in this way.

    So, grant everyone their due process rights, and deport the illegals. They do not have a right to even be in this country in the first place. Block immigration from terrorist breeding grounds whose governments cannot screen their emigrants. Human life is more important than equality. And when we do this, when we accomplish the defense and integrity of our borders, the maintenance of public order, the defense of our nation, you will find that the people of this country have more freedom and dignity for it.

    Reply
  2. posted by David Bauer on

    1. I doubt the Stonewall Inn patrons would fit neatly into 21st century political thinking. The pre Stonewall human rights groups had very little luck in getting either major party to take an interest. Heck, quite a few minor parties didn’t really want to touch the issue.

    If the Stonewall Inn patrons voted in partisan elections, it be unusual for serious candidates to back any gay rights proposals. A truely historical view would be a bit more nuanced.

    With LGBT groups, their is probably always a need for volunteers. Leadership positions can also be tough to fill, because they often don’t come with a salary and require you to be a the “designated queer” in your city or town.

    So, if you don’t have lots of free time and live in a community or work in a job, where coming out ain’t all that grand, you may find it tough to get involved.

    It is -arguably – more about class and geography, but race often mixes with class.

    The problem is that a complicated, legitimate concerned has been edited into another tired old, “duh, liberals must be obsessed about pc -group think. Let’s all vote Republican.”

    The HRC and LCR are fairly well financed, nationally, and can do some good. However, a, state civil rights group or a local community center is (potentially) more relevant because it is closer then DC.

    Yet, from my experience lots of state and local groups struggle to keep the lights on. The people who are in a position to get involved, tend to be professors or lawyers or doctors.

    Is that bad? Well, no. But, its often because lower middle class and blue collar people don’t feel like they can get involved. Which can be a bad thing for many reasons. Like, making it harder to build coalitions or to try to deal with the challenge facing LGBT people who aren’t successful, urbane professionals who can live in trendy neighborhoods.

    Reply
    • posted by Jorge on

      With LGBT groups, their is probably always a need for volunteers. Leadership positions can also be tough to fill, because they often don’t come with a salary and require you to be a the “designated queer” in your city or town.

      Ouch.

      The problem is that a complicated, legitimate concerned has been edited into another tired old, “duh, liberals must be obsessed about pc -group think. Let’s all vote Republican.”

      It’s a solution that does much to reveal the way to overcome disadvantage. To even consider it, you almost have to overcome the problems of politeness and loyalty–not just transfer them to new people–and be willing to make decisions that jeopardize the comfort of others for your own personal benefit. It is not just time that is the enemy of lower and middle class involvement.

      Reply
  3. posted by JohnInCA on

    Show me an article about how millennials are terrible at something or other, and 9 gives you 10, you’re also showing me an article that’s really about a bitter old baby boomer who still expects us to pay for their retirement after their own actions tanked their 401(k)s.

    Reply
  4. posted by David Bauer on

    The key issue is that LGBT groups need – like any nonprofit – need money to exist, people who are able and willing to get involved and a leadership that has a sense about public relations, coalition building, etc.

    If you work in a factory in a small and or rural city, you probably don’t feel safe in being out. You also probably don’t have strong ties to national groups.

    If you are black or Hispanic, you probably deal with racism on a daily basis and worry about dealing with homophobia, if you get involved with the local group.

    If church life is a major part of your life – in some communities its almost a social requirement – you worry about the consequences of losing that social requirement.

    Reply

Leave a Comment